Jump to content

IPB Style© Fisana
 

Clogged pond pump


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_celiaryker_*

Guest_celiaryker_*
  • Guests

Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:18 PM

I came home last weekend to find the the pump in my pond not working. It had been fine on Friday, not on Sunday morning. I went out and pressed the reset button on the outlet and all was well for a few hours. I unplugged the other lights that were functioning off that circuit but the reset switch popped again. I pulled the pump and cleaned the leaves etc. off the bottom. It had been sitting on a block but may have fallen off.

I removed the plastic filter that was clogged and cleaned it well. I found that just beneath was quite clean so the screen was doing it's job. I reset the screen and then tested to see that the pump was working. By the way, do not do this in your bathtub. I had enough water in the tub and closed the shower curtain and Don plugged in the pump. First response, it's working. Second response, the realization of how much water that pump can move to the ceiling and then splash all over the room. When we stopped laughing we cleaned up the mess and put the pump back in the pond but couldn't be sure we got it on the block again with the ice and all. It worked fine for a couple of days, then stopped again.

I took it up and cleaned it again but it didn't seem that clogged. Should I lay a 2x4 across the pond and try to suspend the pump so it doesn't sit on the bottom at all? That was Don's idea but I hate the look. Can I set it in shallower water on a brick and just clean it regularly until I can reset the block and do some pond clean up? I also wonder how this will affect the gold fish that have been in the pond for two years.

I await your suggestions and can take the giggling at our indoor water feature adventure. Like none of you have ever done anything that stupid.
  • 0

#2 ScottBates

ScottBates
  • Members
  • 0 posts

Posted 21 February 2006 - 07:27 PM

celiaryker,

I gave up on using water pumps during the winter. I prefer to use a pump that moves air into the pond. This disturbs the water less in the deep section and still provides areation to the fish. They use less electricity and if they fail you do not have to get wet and cold to fix it.

As far as the water pump is concerned it sounds like the ground fault interupter is tired (broken) or the pump seals have gone out. You can check the cord to see if there are any nicks in it. That will do it every time.

I have done far worse, once I filled one of our ponds for two days. It should have only taken 3 or 4 hours. And then there was the time................... oh never mind about that one.


  • 0

#3 Guest_celiaryker_*

Guest_celiaryker_*
  • Guests

Posted 25 February 2006 - 06:29 PM

I decided to use a heater instead of pump to keep the water open and you were so right. It is the outlet that is the problem. Working from the usual outlet the heater that I was using in place of the pump tripped the circuit breaker. From another outlet the heater worked just fine.
The fish act like I put a little camp fire in just for them. I see all thirty of them suspended around the heater looking as if they were sitting aroung a camp fire. Will this work for the winter? I can keep the water open in this area and resume the pump when spring arrives. In the meantime I will have an electrician look at the outlet that is acting up.
Thanks for the help.

Celia
  • 0

#4 ScottBates

ScottBates
  • Members
  • 0 posts

Posted 27 February 2006 - 04:35 PM

Oh yes,
It will work since the worst of the winter is over now. Next winter you can try using a small air pump along with the heater. The air pump will help keep the oxygen levels up with a minimum of circulation. The heater certainly isn't going to hurt. If the pond is less than 30 inches deep then the heater is very important.

Think spring

  • 0




Copyright © 2014 Green Earth, LLC